Blogger Outreach Example Template to Use

reach *

I’ve been talking about outreach and more specifically blogger outreach a lot in recent months. I’ve done lots of outreach myself as well. Until now the concept has still remained a bit abstract though.

Today I’d like to give you an actual blogger outreach example or rather a template you can use universally just by replacing some place holders.

It’s a first contact “cold outreach” message you can send to someone you haven’t written before.

You need to do your homework first. You have to know the name of the person you contact, their blog title and a what the blogger is actually writing about. Additionally you need to point out a specific post that has caught your eye. Don’t just look up the “about” page. At least skim through the actual blog posts.

Then there is a simple formula for successful outreach messages – it’s what/why/who.

  • “What” is the value proposition, for example a product to test
  • “Why” is the reason you are approaching the specific blogger
  • “Who” is the company and person who does the outreach

The value proposition is the most important factor. It has to be the main focus of the message headline.

A perfect blogger outreach headline sounds as follows:

[Value Proposition] for [Blog Title] (Readers)

EXAMPLE:

“Free Entry to Fashion X Show for Modern Style Readers”

“Modern Style” would be the hypothetical fashion blog you are sending the message to. The “Free Entry” for the “Fashion X Show” I made up as an example is the value proposition. Now you probably understand why you need the “readers” and not just the blog title in the message subject. You don’t want to sound like a bot offering the free entry to the blog itself.

Also it’s better to suggest a freebie for readers instead of bribing the blogger. In many cases you will end up giving the bloggers themselves your freebies but try not to start your conversation by offering money or goods for publicity.

So remember: the value proposition is the most important thing about the outreach email. Do not tell the people what you want to take from them but what you are willing to give them.

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Subject: [Value Proposition] for [Blog Title] (Readers)

Hello [Blogger Name]!

when researching [your topic] I have come across your post
[URL]

It seems you are an expert on [your topic]. That’s why I want to offer you [value proposition] for your [Blog Title] (readers).

We [(Company You Represent)] already help many people with [your topic] so ideally we can join forces.

Sincerely, Your Name

 

Your Name
Blogger Outreach & Relations
Company You Represent
Your Phone Number
Your Mail Address

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You see that the first message is very short. You don’t want to write a huge overwhelming letter the first time you contact someone. You just want to establish a connection. Now that you have their attention after they reply you can go into more details but still value their time.

Also make sure not to appear as a sales type of person including SEO, marketing and PR and other types of disciplines most people on the Web loath. Just describe yourself in your signature as what you are, an outreach person.

You don’t need to sound lofty like a “blogging relationship management officer” or something.

Just state in a plain and simple manner what you do. Also make sure to mention your actual client both in the message and in the signature so that’s it’s clear that you reach out in the name of someone not just for yourself

Let’s see how that template would look with the hypothetical fashion blog I have introduced earlier:

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Subject: Free Entry to Fashion X Show for Modern Style Readers

Hello Jane!

when researching fashion shows I have come across your post
http://modernstyle.com/best-fashion-shows-of-2012.html

It seems you are an expert on fashion shows. That’s why I want to offer you free entry to Fashion Show X for your Modern Style readers.

We (Fashionstore.com) already help many people with fashion shows so ideally we can join forces.

Sincerely, Tad

 

Tad Chef
Blogger Outreach & Relations
Fashionstore.com
03-241-5982
tadchef@fashionstore.com

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You may ask yourself whether such an outreach email does work. It does, I got lots of replies, I think two thirds of bloggers replied to these highly relevant messages. The rest depends on you. Convincing the bloggers to really publish is not as easy as making them read your email and reply. It’s a good start though.

Make sure to customize this template a bit depending on your needs.

In case everybody starts sending the exact same message it will soon stop working as bloggers will assume it’s some kind of automated scam. Using a template is not a problem as long as you personalize the email properly and know who you are talking to. You don’t need to reinvent the wheel each time.

Additional blogger outreach resources elsewhere:

  1. The (Previously) Unwritten Rules of Outreach
  2. 3 Ways to Drastically Improve Outreach for “Big Content” [Case Study]
  3. 5 Keys to Building a Successful Outreach List for Link Building
  4. An Outreach Experiment for Paid Links in the Travel Industry
  5. Dear Rand Fishkin…
  6. The One Thing Killing Your Blogger Outreach
  7. How to Get Blogger Reviews [Real Outreach Examples]
  8. Build Better Blogger Relationships This Valentine’s Day
  9. Blogger Outreach Software – GroupHigh
  10. Inkybee — Smarter blogger relations… for the busy PR pro

 

*Creative Commons image by Tomi Tapio

11 responses to “Blogger Outreach Example Template to Use

  1. As a popular blogger, that sort of email would get deleted so fast it’d make your head spin. I don’t care about your fashion show and I’ve never heard of it (is usually what I think when I get emails like that.) Also, I’m not a PR vehicle for your company.

    What works? Offering a product that I’d actually find valuable and write about. I’m working on this with a guy who wrote a great product that I happily paid $40 for. Now I’m running a JV with him and I got him to program in a coupon so my readers get $5 off the $40 product–a win-win-win for all involved. The difference is that it didn’t start out with some junk email (you can’t even capitalize the “When” as the first word in your sentence?!)–it started from a mutually beneficial relationship.

    1. Well, I’m a blogger myself as you see and I just because I don’t know a product yet doesn’t mean I will delete the email. You may not care for the fashion show because you are too cool for it but another blogger will be glad to get free entry there especially if s/he has been writing about fashion shows earlier.

      I’m a big proponent of relationships, it seems you haven’t read any of my other posts, but some of them start with an email. Of course there are many rude bloggers like you out there, that don’t give someone a chance if they are not in their inner circle of super bloggers but I quickly ignore those and connect with those who care.

      I’ve been blogging myself for a decade now and I know that many bloggers are like you and will be condescending but that’s life.

    2. Well, I’m a blogger myself as you see and I just because I don’t know a product yet doesn’t mean I will delete the email. You may not care for the fashion show because you are too cool for it but another blogger will be glad to get free entry there especially if s/he has been writing about fashion shows earlier.

      I’m a big proponent of relationships, it seems you haven’t read any of my other posts, but some of them start with an email. Of course there are many rude bloggers like you out there, that don’t give someone a chance if they are not in their inner circle of super bloggers but I quickly ignore those and connect with those who care.

      I’ve been blogging myself for a decade now and I know that many bloggers are like you and will be condescending but that’s life.

  2. As a popular blogger, that sort of email would get deleted so fast it’d make your head spin. I don’t care about your fashion show and I’ve never heard of it (is usually what I think when I get emails like that.) Also, I’m not a PR vehicle for your company.

    What works? Offering a product that I’d actually find valuable and write about. I’m working on this with a guy who wrote a great product that I happily paid $40 for. Now I’m running a JV with him and I got him to program in a coupon so my readers get $5 off the $40 product–a win-win-win for all involved. The difference is that it didn’t start out with some junk email (you can’t even capitalize the “When” as the first word in your sentence?!)–it started from a mutually beneficial relationship.

    1. You can mention the broken link (in case of broken link outreach) right away in the first message. You can even add the resources you suggest to replace the broken link.

      Just replace the last sentence with the more concrete “I noticed that a link in your post is broken … we have also published a post on a similar topic …”.

    2. You can mention the broken link (in case of broken link outreach) right away in the first message. You can even add the resources you suggest to replace the broken link.

      Just replace the last sentence with the more concrete “I noticed that a link in your post is broken … we have also published a post on a similar topic …”.

  3. I found this helpful. As Erica made very clear, some bloggers already have their minds made up before they open emails. But for those that aren’t too cool to make assumptions I think this template will do great. I’m actually going to test it out this week. I know I get a lot of outreach emails, and I have no problem posting guest articles. I just want a quick legible email from a real person with something of value to offer. I consider high quality content valuable.

  4. I found this helpful. As Erica made very clear, some bloggers already have their minds made up before they open emails. But for those that aren’t too cool to make assumptions I think this template will do great. I’m actually going to test it out this week. I know I get a lot of outreach emails, and I have no problem posting guest articles. I just want a quick legible email from a real person with something of value to offer. I consider high quality content valuable.

  5. Still, relevancy is very important in every business for them to connect easily to each other and in that way, you can get more leads with less efforts. This is very important especially when you are a PR section.

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